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Interview with amazing author Kathleen Andrews Davis

February 21, 2015

Kathleen030ret-001

Smoke and Mirrors cover

The Blue Velvet 3

Today I have the pleasure of chatting with amazing author, Kathleen Andrews Davis. Kathleen, I welcome you to talk about your books today. I’ve read and reviewed Smoke and Mirrors. It’s a wonderful book, congratulations.”

Thank you, Deanie, I’m excited to be here as well and I appreciate your compliment regarding my book.”

Have you always been interested in writing?

Actually, I hated writing in school.  I was a math, science, and phys ed student.  Phys Ed of course being my favorite!  I didn’t start enjoying writing until I had to do it on my job where I had to do business communications, press releases, policy and procedures manuals, and marketing materials.  My favorite assignment was as the managing editor of an in-house newspaper.  I liked everything about that project.

Do you have a favorite story that you’ve written?

I don’t do a lot of short story writing, so I would have to say a story I wrote for a contest (and took second place) about driving on the left side of the road when a friend and I traveled to  Ireland.  I called it Left is Right.

 Do your books usually have a central message to share with your readers?

I try very hard to have the subliminal message of strong moral background and good common sense.

 Are you working on any projects now?

Yes, I’m working on the third book in the Emerson’s Attic series; it will be called Quiet Heart.  When I can squeeze it in, I also work on my second adult manuscript which is entirely different than Emerson’s Attic.

What are your goals for this year?

  1. Publish Quiet Heart.
  2. Get marketing organized to a point where it will take less time in the future.
  3. Get an agent interested in my first adult manuscript.

Is there anyone in particular who encouraged you to write?

Yes, I have a wonderful friend, Carolyn Sparks, who is my mentor and muse.  She never stops encouraging me.  You, as a writer, know how important it is to have someone who keeps you on the straight and narrow, or in Carolyn’s case we like to say the yellow brick road.  Carolyn not only encourages me, she proofreads.  She also, unintentionally, gives me lots of ideas from her own experiences.  She has wonderful stories from which I sometimes take ideas, with her permission of course.

What age range are your books most appropriate for?

Emerson’s Attic is for middle-grade readers, ages 9-14.  However, I believe it really depends on the reader.  I’ve had some youngsters say they think the books are too hard and others tell me they’re too easy.  And, I’ve had adults tell me they enjoyed the books.  I will say that I do not “write down” to young readers.  Since Emerson, the main character, is a time traveler I use vocabulary, historical facts, and geography from every place she goes.  In The Blue Velvet, I used references to classic books such as Pride and Prejudice in the hope it would spark interest in readers to read those books.

Can you please include links where your books can be purchased?

The Blue Velvet:    http://www.amazon.com/Blue-Velvet-Emersons-Attic-Book-ebook/dp/B00E1OONUO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1424462391&sr=8-1&keywords=Emerson%27s+attic

Smoke and Mirrorshttp://www.amazon.com/Smoke-Mirrors-Book-Emersons-Attic/dp/0989438937/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1424462475&sr=8-2&keywords=Emerson%27s+attic%2C+smoke+and+mirrors

Both books are available in paperback and e-book.

Books can also be ordered by any Bookstore through their distributors Ingram or Baker and Taylor.

Would you say your writing is any particular style?

Hmmm, I would say my style is simple narrative.  I try to write clean without unnecessary adjectives and fast-paced to keep the reader interested.

Is there anything else you’d like to share?

I didn’t set out to write historical fiction but readers are now telling me that’s how they would describe Emerson’s Attic.  I research every time period where Emerson travels and try to be as accurate as possible with details.  Apparently, this research has paid off if readers feel they are learning something when they read Emerson’s Attic, and that puts a smile on my face.

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